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News

The Naked Mountain
reveals all to an H4D-40

23/01/2012 On our website we say:“Hasselblad has been taking image quality to new and unexplored heights for over fifty years”. And we add: “With the H4D-40, any serious photographer will be able to take their photography to a higher creative and technical level.”

Well “new and unexplored heights and higher creative and technical levels” don’t come  much more unexplored or higher than halfway up one of the world’s most dangerous mountains.

Image1

Photo by Matteo Zanga .


When The North Face – a leading high performance outdoor clothing and equipment supplier – agreed to sponsor an attempt by two climbers to be the first to reach the summit of Pakistan’s Nanga Parbat (Naked Mountain) in winter – we agreed to provide specialist photographer Matteo Zanga with an H4D-40 to document the trip from base camp.

Image2

Photo by Matteo Zanga.

And you can follow the trip as it progresses, from this link:
http://www.thenorthfacejournal.com/category/nanga-parbat/

Also visit the following link for video messages from the team:
http://www.thenorthfacejournal.com/nanga-parbat-winter-expedition-video-dispatch-2/

Paul Waterworth, Hasselblad’s Global Photographer Relations Manager told Hasselblad News: “This peak, at 8,125 metres, is also known as ‘Killer Mountain’ – for very good reason, and it has never been successfully climbed in winter before.  

Image3

Photo by Matteo Zanga .


When Italian mountaineer Simone Moro and his Kazakh friend Denis Urubko decided to take it on they asked Matteo to film the event from Base Camp. Matteo asked us if we could lend the team a Hasselblad H4D-40 – but before we did we took a unit to a commercial deep freeze area and put it through its paces at minus 30 degrees Celsius. Now Matteo is using it for real in an incredibly extreme and unforgiving environment.”

*We will be running a full feature in Hasselblad VICTOR Magazine when the climbers return.